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suricata.yaml —

%YAML 1.1

# Suricata configuration file. In addition to the comments describing all
# options in this file, full documentation can be found at:
# https://redmine.openinfosecfoundation.org/projects/suricata/wiki/Suricatayaml

##
## Step 1: inform Suricata about your network
##

vars:
# more specifc is better for alert accuracy and performance
address-groups:
#HOME_NET: “[192.168.0.0/16,10.0.0.0/8,172.16.0.0/12]”
HOME_NET: “[192.168.2.0/24]”
#HOME_NET: “[10.0.0.0/8]”
#HOME_NET: “[172.16.0.0/12]”
#HOME_NET: “any”

EXTERNAL_NET: “!$HOME_NET”
#EXTERNAL_NET: “any”

HTTP_SERVERS: “$HOME_NET”
SMTP_SERVERS: “$HOME_NET”
SQL_SERVERS: “$HOME_NET”
DNS_SERVERS: “$HOME_NET”
TELNET_SERVERS: “$HOME_NET”
AIM_SERVERS: “$EXTERNAL_NET”
DNP3_SERVER: “$HOME_NET”
DNP3_CLIENT: “$HOME_NET”
MODBUS_CLIENT: “$HOME_NET”
MODBUS_SERVER: “$HOME_NET”
ENIP_CLIENT: “$HOME_NET”
ENIP_SERVER: “$HOME_NET”

port-groups:
HTTP_PORTS: “80”
SHELLCODE_PORTS: “!80”
ORACLE_PORTS: 1521
SSH_PORTS: 22
DNP3_PORTS: 20000
MODBUS_PORTS: 502

##
## Step 2: select the rules to enable or disable
##

default-rule-path: /etc/suricata/rules
rule-files:
– botcc.rules
# – botcc.portgrouped.rules
– ciarmy.rules
– compromised.rules
– drop.rules
– dshield.rules
# – emerging-activex.rules
– emerging-attack_response.rules
– emerging-chat.rules
– emerging-current_events.rules
– emerging-dns.rules
– emerging-dos.rules
– emerging-exploit.rules
– emerging-ftp.rules
# – emerging-games.rules
# – emerging-icmp_info.rules
# – emerging-icmp.rules
– emerging-imap.rules
# – emerging-inappropriate.rules
# – emerging-info.rules
– emerging-malware.rules
– emerging-misc.rules
– emerging-mobile_malware.rules
– emerging-netbios.rules
– emerging-p2p.rules
– emerging-policy.rules
– emerging-pop3.rules
– emerging-rpc.rules
# – emerging-scada.rules
# – emerging-scada_special.rules
– emerging-scan.rules
# – emerging-shellcode.rules
– emerging-smtp.rules
– emerging-snmp.rules
– emerging-sql.rules
– emerging-telnet.rules
– emerging-tftp.rules
– emerging-trojan.rules
– emerging-user_agents.rules
– emerging-voip.rules
– emerging-web_client.rules
– emerging-web_server.rules
# – emerging-web_specific_apps.rules
– emerging-worm.rules
– tor.rules
# – decoder-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
# – stream-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
– http-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
– smtp-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
– dns-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
– tls-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
# – modbus-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
# – app-layer-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir
# – dnp3-events.rules # available in suricata sources under rules dir

classification-file: /etc/suricata/classification.config
reference-config-file: /etc/suricata/reference.config
# threshold-file: /etc/suricata/threshold.config

##
## Step 3: select outputs to enable
##

# The default logging directory. Any log or output file will be
# placed here if its not specified with a full path name. This can be
# overridden with the -l command line parameter.
default-log-dir: /var/log/suricata/

# global stats configuration
stats:
enabled: yes
# The interval field (in seconds) controls at what interval
# the loggers are invoked.
interval: 8

# Configure the type of alert (and other) logging you would like.
outputs:
# a line based alerts log similar to Snort’s fast.log
– fast:
enabled: yes
filename: fast.log
append: yes
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’

# Extensible Event Format (nicknamed EVE) event log in JSON format
– eve-log:
enabled: yes
filetype: regular #regular|syslog|unix_dgram|unix_stream|redis
filename: eve.json
#prefix: “@cee: ” # prefix to prepend to each log entry
# the following are valid when type: syslog above
#identity: “suricata”
#facility: local5
#level: Info ## possible levels: Emergency, Alert, Critical,
## Error, Warning, Notice, Info, Debug
#redis:
# server: 127.0.0.1
# port: 6379
# mode: list ## possible values: list (default), channel
# key: suricata ## key or channel to use (default to suricata)
# Redis pipelining set up. This will enable to only do a query every
# ‘batch-size’ events. This should lower the latency induced by network
# connection at the cost of some memory. There is no flushing implemented
# so this setting as to be reserved to high traffic suricata.
# pipelining:
# enabled: yes ## set enable to yes to enable query pipelining
# batch-size: 10 ## number of entry to keep in buffer
types:
– alert:
# payload: yes # enable dumping payload in Base64
# payload-buffer-size: 4kb # max size of payload buffer to output in eve-log
# payload-printable: yes # enable dumping payload in printable (lossy) format
# packet: yes # enable dumping of packet (without stream segments)
http: yes # enable dumping of http fields
tls: yes # enable dumping of tls fields
ssh: yes # enable dumping of ssh fields
smtp: yes # enable dumping of smtp fields
dnp3: yes # enable dumping of DNP3 fields

# Enable the logging of tagged packets for rules using the
# “tag” keyword.
tagged-packets: yes

# HTTP X-Forwarded-For support by adding an extra field or overwriting
# the source or destination IP address (depending on flow direction)
# with the one reported in the X-Forwarded-For HTTP header. This is
# helpful when reviewing alerts for traffic that is being reverse
# or forward proxied.
xff:
enabled: no
# Two operation modes are available, “extra-data” and “overwrite”.
mode: extra-data
# Two proxy deployments are supported, “reverse” and “forward”. In
# a “reverse” deployment the IP address used is the last one, in a
# “forward” deployment the first IP address is used.
deployment: reverse
# Header name where the actual IP address will be reported, if more
# than one IP address is present, the last IP address will be the
# one taken into consideration.
header: X-Forwarded-For
– http:
extended: yes # enable this for extended logging information
# custom allows additional http fields to be included in eve-log
# the example below adds three additional fields when uncommented
#custom: [Accept-Encoding, Accept-Language, Authorization]
– dns:
# control logging of queries and answers
# default yes, no to disable
query: yes # enable logging of DNS queries
answer: yes # enable logging of DNS answers
# control which RR types are logged
# all enabled if custom not specified
#custom: [a, aaaa, cname, mx, ns, ptr, txt]
– tls:
extended: yes # enable this for extended logging information
– files:
force-magic: no # force logging magic on all logged files
# force logging of checksums, available hash functions are md5,
# sha1 and sha256
#force-hash: [md5]
#- drop:
# alerts: yes # log alerts that caused drops
# flows: all # start or all: ‘start’ logs only a single drop
# # per flow direction. All logs each dropped pkt.
– smtp:
#extended: yes # enable this for extended logging information
# this includes: bcc, message-id, subject, x_mailer, user-agent
# custom fields logging from the list:
# reply-to, bcc, message-id, subject, x-mailer, user-agent, received,
# x-originating-ip, in-reply-to, references, importance, priority,
# sensitivity, organization, content-md5, date
#custom: [received, x-mailer, x-originating-ip, relays, reply-to, bcc]
# output md5 of fields: body, subject
# for the body you need to set app-layer.protocols.smtp.mime.body-md5
# to yes
#md5: [body, subject]

– ssh
– stats:
totals: yes # stats for all threads merged together
threads: no # per thread stats
deltas: no # include delta values
# bi-directional flows
– flow
# uni-directional flows
#- netflow
#- dnp3

# alert output for use with Barnyard2
– unified2-alert:
enabled: no
filename: unified2.alert

# File size limit. Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number
# is parsed as bytes.
#limit: 32mb

# Sensor ID field of unified2 alerts.
#sensor-id: 0

# Include payload of packets related to alerts. Defaults to true, set to
# false if payload is not required.
#payload: yes

# HTTP X-Forwarded-For support by adding the unified2 extra header or
# overwriting the source or destination IP address (depending on flow
# direction) with the one reported in the X-Forwarded-For HTTP header.
# This is helpful when reviewing alerts for traffic that is being reverse
# or forward proxied.
xff:
enabled: no
# Two operation modes are available, “extra-data” and “overwrite”. Note
# that in the “overwrite” mode, if the reported IP address in the HTTP
# X-Forwarded-For header is of a different version of the packet
# received, it will fall-back to “extra-data” mode.
mode: extra-data
# Two proxy deployments are supported, “reverse” and “forward”. In
# a “reverse” deployment the IP address used is the last one, in a
# “forward” deployment the first IP address is used.
deployment: reverse
# Header name where the actual IP address will be reported, if more
# than one IP address is present, the last IP address will be the
# one taken into consideration.
header: X-Forwarded-For

# a line based log of HTTP requests (no alerts)
– http-log:
enabled: no
filename: http.log
append: yes
#extended: yes # enable this for extended logging information
#custom: yes # enabled the custom logging format (defined by customformat)
#customformat: “%{%D-%H:%M:%S}t.%z %{X-Forwarded-For}i %H %m %h %u %s %B %a:%p -> %A:%P”
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’

# a line based log of TLS handshake parameters (no alerts)
– tls-log:
enabled: no # Log TLS connections.
filename: tls.log # File to store TLS logs.
append: yes
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’
#extended: yes # Log extended information like fingerprint

# output module to store certificates chain to disk
– tls-store:
enabled: no
#certs-log-dir: certs # directory to store the certificates files

# a line based log of DNS requests and/or replies (no alerts)
– dns-log:
enabled: no
filename: dns.log
append: yes
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’

# Packet log… log packets in pcap format. 3 modes of operation: “normal”
# “multi” and “sguil”.
#
# In normal mode a pcap file “filename” is created in the default-log-dir,
# or are as specified by “dir”.
# In multi mode, a file is created per thread. This will perform much
# better, but will create multiple files where ‘normal’ would create one.
# In multi mode the filename takes a few special variables:
# – %n — thread number
# – %i — thread id
# – %t — timestamp (secs or secs.usecs based on ‘ts-format’
# E.g. filename: pcap.%n.%t
#
# Note that it’s possible to use directories, but the directories are not
# created by Suricata. E.g. filename: pcaps/%n/log.%s will log into the
# per thread directory.
#
# Also note that the limit and max-files settings are enforced per thread.
# So the size limit when using 8 threads with 1000mb files and 2000 files
# is: 8*1000*2000 ~ 16TiB.
#
# In Sguil mode “dir” indicates the base directory. In this base dir the
# pcaps are created in th directory structure Sguil expects:
#
# $sguil-base-dir/YYYY-MM-DD/$filename.<timestamp>
#
# By default all packets are logged except:
# – TCP streams beyond stream.reassembly.depth
# – encrypted streams after the key exchange
#
– pcap-log:
enabled: no
filename: log.pcap

# File size limit. Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number
# is parsed as bytes.
limit: 1000mb

# If set to a value will enable ring buffer mode. Will keep Maximum of “max-files” of size “limit”
max-files: 2000

mode: normal # normal, multi or sguil.

# Directory to place pcap files. If not provided the default log
# directory will be used. Required for “sguil” mode.
#dir: /nsm_data/

#ts-format: usec # sec or usec second format (default) is filename.sec usec is filename.sec.usec
use-stream-depth: no #If set to “yes” packets seen after reaching stream inspection depth are ignored. “no” logs all packets
honor-pass-rules: no # If set to “yes”, flows in which a pass rule matched will stopped being logged.

# a full alerts log containing much information for signature writers
# or for investigating suspected false positives.
– alert-debug:
enabled: no
filename: alert-debug.log
append: yes
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’

# alert output to prelude (http://www.prelude-technologies.com/) only
# available if Suricata has been compiled with –enable-prelude
– alert-prelude:
enabled: no
profile: suricata
log-packet-content: no
log-packet-header: yes

# Stats.log contains data from various counters of the suricata engine.
– stats:
enabled: yes
filename: stats.log
totals: yes # stats for all threads merged together
threads: no # per thread stats
#null-values: yes # print counters that have value 0

# a line based alerts log similar to fast.log into syslog
– syslog:
enabled: yes
# reported identity to syslog. If ommited the program name (usually
# suricata) will be used.
identity: “suricata”
facility: local5
#level: Info ## possible levels: Emergency, Alert, Critical,
## Error, Warning, Notice, Info, Debug

# a line based information for dropped packets in IPS mode
– drop:
enabled: no
filename: drop.log
append: yes
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’

# output module to store extracted files to disk
#
# The files are stored to the log-dir in a format “file.<id>” where <id> is
# an incrementing number starting at 1. For each file “file.<id>” a meta
# file “file.<id>.meta” is created.
#
# File extraction depends on a lot of things to be fully done:
# – file-store stream-depth. For optimal results, set this to 0 (unlimited)
# – http request / response body sizes. Again set to 0 for optimal results.
# – rules that contain the “filestore” keyword.
– file-store:
enabled: no # set to yes to enable
log-dir: files # directory to store the files
force-magic: no # force logging magic on all stored files
# force logging of checksums, available hash functions are md5,
# sha1 and sha256
#force-hash: [md5]
force-filestore: no # force storing of all files
# override global stream-depth for sessions in which we want to
# perform file extraction. Set to 0 for unlimited.
#stream-depth: 0
#waldo: file.waldo # waldo file to store the file_id across runs

# output module to log files tracked in a easily parsable json format
– file-log:
enabled: no
filename: files-json.log
append: yes
#filetype: regular # ‘regular’, ‘unix_stream’ or ‘unix_dgram’

force-magic: no # force logging magic on all logged files
# force logging of checksums, available hash functions are md5,
# sha1 and sha256
#force-hash: [md5]

# Log TCP data after stream normalization
# 2 types: file or dir. File logs into a single logfile. Dir creates
# 2 files per TCP session and stores the raw TCP data into them.
# Using ‘both’ will enable both file and dir modes.
#
# Note: limited by stream.depth
– tcp-data:
enabled: no
type: file
filename: tcp-data.log

# Log HTTP body data after normalization, dechunking and unzipping.
# 2 types: file or dir. File logs into a single logfile. Dir creates
# 2 files per HTTP session and stores the normalized data into them.
# Using ‘both’ will enable both file and dir modes.
#
# Note: limited by the body limit settings
– http-body-data:
enabled: no
type: file
filename: http-data.log

# Lua Output Support – execute lua script to generate alert and event
# output.
# Documented at:
# https://redmine.openinfosecfoundation.org/projects/suricata/wiki/Lua_Output
– lua:
enabled: no
#scripts-dir: /etc/suricata/lua-output/
scripts:
# – script1.lua

# Logging configuration. This is not about logging IDS alerts/events, but
# output about what Suricata is doing, like startup messages, errors, etc.
logging:
# The default log level, can be overridden in an output section.
# Note that debug level logging will only be emitted if Suricata was
# compiled with the –enable-debug configure option.
#
# This value is overriden by the SC_LOG_LEVEL env var.
default-log-level: notice

# The default output format. Optional parameter, should default to
# something reasonable if not provided. Can be overriden in an
# output section. You can leave this out to get the default.
#
# This value is overriden by the SC_LOG_FORMAT env var.
#default-log-format: “[%i] %t – (%f:%l) <%d> (%n) — ”

# A regex to filter output. Can be overridden in an output section.
# Defaults to empty (no filter).
#
# This value is overriden by the SC_LOG_OP_FILTER env var.
default-output-filter:

# Define your logging outputs. If none are defined, or they are all
# disabled you will get the default – console output.
outputs:
– console:
enabled: yes
# type: json
– file:
enabled: yes
level: info
filename: /var/log/suricata/suricata.log
# type: json
– syslog:
enabled: no
facility: local5
format: “[%i] <%d> — ”
# type: json

##
## Step 4: configure common capture settings
##
## See “Advanced Capture Options” below for more options, including NETMAP
## and PF_RING.
##

# Linux high speed capture support
af-packet:
– interface: eth0
# Number of receive threads. “auto” uses the number of cores
#threads: auto
# Default clusterid. AF_PACKET will load balance packets based on flow.
cluster-id: 99
# Default AF_PACKET cluster type. AF_PACKET can load balance per flow or per hash.
# This is only supported for Linux kernel > 3.1
# possible value are:
# * cluster_round_robin: round robin load balancing
# * cluster_flow: all packets of a given flow are send to the same socket
# * cluster_cpu: all packets treated in kernel by a CPU are send to the same socket
# * cluster_qm: all packets linked by network card to a RSS queue are sent to the same
# socket. Requires at least Linux 3.14.
# * cluster_random: packets are sent randomly to sockets but with an equipartition.
# Requires at least Linux 3.14.
# * cluster_rollover: kernel rotates between sockets filling each socket before moving
# to the next. Requires at least Linux 3.10.
# Recommended modes are cluster_flow on most boxes and cluster_cpu or cluster_qm on system
# with capture card using RSS (require cpu affinity tuning and system irq tuning)
cluster-type: cluster_flow
# In some fragmentation case, the hash can not be computed. If “defrag” is set
# to yes, the kernel will do the needed defragmentation before sending the packets.
defrag: yes
# After Linux kernel 3.10 it is possible to activate the rollover option: if a socket is
# full then kernel will send the packet on the next socket with room available. This option
# can minimize packet drop and increase the treated bandwidth on single intensive flow.
#rollover: yes
# To use the ring feature of AF_PACKET, set ‘use-mmap’ to yes
#use-mmap: yes
# Lock memory map to avoid it goes to swap. Be careful that over suscribing could lock
# your system
#mmap-locked: yes
# Use experimental tpacket_v3 capture mode, only active if use-mmap is true
#tpacket-v3: yes
# Ring size will be computed with respect to max_pending_packets and number
# of threads. You can set manually the ring size in number of packets by setting
# the following value. If you are using flow cluster-type and have really network
# intensive single-flow you could want to set the ring-size independently of the number
# of threads:
#ring-size: 2048
# Block size is used by tpacket_v3 only. It should set to a value high enough to contain
# a decent number of packets. Size is in bytes so please consider your MTU. It should be
# a power of 2 and it must be multiple of page size (usually 4096).
#block-size: 32768
# tpacket_v3 block timeout: an open block is passed to userspace if it is not
# filled after block-timeout milliseconds.
#block-timeout: 10
# On busy system, this could help to set it to yes to recover from a packet drop
# phase. This will result in some packets (at max a ring flush) being non treated.
#use-emergency-flush: yes
# recv buffer size, increase value could improve performance
# buffer-size: 32768
# Set to yes to disable promiscuous mode
# disable-promisc: no
# Choose checksum verification mode for the interface. At the moment
# of the capture, some packets may be with an invalid checksum due to
# offloading to the network card of the checksum computation.
# Possible values are:
# – kernel: use indication sent by kernel for each packet (default)
# – yes: checksum validation is forced
# – no: checksum validation is disabled
# – auto: suricata uses a statistical approach to detect when
# checksum off-loading is used.
# Warning: ‘checksum-validation’ must be set to yes to have any validation
#checksum-checks: kernel
# BPF filter to apply to this interface. The pcap filter syntax apply here.
#bpf-filter: port 80 or udp
# You can use the following variables to activate AF_PACKET tap or IPS mode.
# If copy-mode is set to ips or tap, the traffic coming to the current
# interface will be copied to the copy-iface interface. If ‘tap’ is set, the
# copy is complete. If ‘ips’ is set, the packet matching a ‘drop’ action
# will not be copied.
#copy-mode: ips
#copy-iface: eth1

# Put default values here. These will be used for an interface that is not
# in the list above.
– interface: default
#threads: auto
#use-mmap: no
#rollover: yes
#tpacket-v3: yes

# Cross platform libpcap capture support
pcap:
– interface: eth0
# On Linux, pcap will try to use mmaped capture and will use buffer-size
# as total of memory used by the ring. So set this to something bigger
# than 1% of your bandwidth.
#buffer-size: 16777216
#bpf-filter: “tcp and port 25”
# Choose checksum verification mode for the interface. At the moment
# of the capture, some packets may be with an invalid checksum due to
# offloading to the network card of the checksum computation.
# Possible values are:
# – yes: checksum validation is forced
# – no: checksum validation is disabled
# – auto: suricata uses a statistical approach to detect when
# checksum off-loading is used. (default)
# Warning: ‘checksum-validation’ must be set to yes to have any validation
#checksum-checks: auto
# With some accelerator cards using a modified libpcap (like myricom), you
# may want to have the same number of capture threads as the number of capture
# rings. In this case, set up the threads variable to N to start N threads
# listening on the same interface.
#threads: 16
# set to no to disable promiscuous mode:
#promisc: no
# set snaplen, if not set it defaults to MTU if MTU can be known
# via ioctl call and to full capture if not.
#snaplen: 1518
# Put default values here
– interface: default
#checksum-checks: auto

# Settings for reading pcap files
pcap-file:
# Possible values are:
# – yes: checksum validation is forced
# – no: checksum validation is disabled
# – auto: suricata uses a statistical approach to detect when
# checksum off-loading is used. (default)
# Warning: ‘checksum-validation’ must be set to yes to have checksum tested
checksum-checks: auto

# See “Advanced Capture Options” below for more options, including NETMAP
# and PF_RING.

##
## Step 5: App Layer Protocol Configuration
##

# Configure the app-layer parsers. The protocols section details each
# protocol.
#
# The option “enabled” takes 3 values – “yes”, “no”, “detection-only”.
# “yes” enables both detection and the parser, “no” disables both, and
# “detection-only” enables protocol detection only (parser disabled).
app-layer:
protocols:
tls:
enabled: yes
detection-ports:
dp: 443

# Completely stop processing TLS/SSL session after the handshake
# completed. If bypass is enabled this will also trigger flow
# bypass. If disabled (the default), TLS/SSL session is still
# tracked for Heartbleed and other anomalies.
#no-reassemble: yes
dcerpc:
enabled: yes
ftp:
enabled: yes
ssh:
enabled: yes
smtp:
enabled: yes
# Configure SMTP-MIME Decoder
mime:
# Decode MIME messages from SMTP transactions
# (may be resource intensive)
# This field supercedes all others because it turns the entire
# process on or off
decode-mime: yes

# Decode MIME entity bodies (ie. base64, quoted-printable, etc.)
decode-base64: yes
decode-quoted-printable: yes

# Maximum bytes per header data value stored in the data structure
# (default is 2000)
header-value-depth: 2000

# Extract URLs and save in state data structure
extract-urls: yes
# Set to yes to compute the md5 of the mail body. You will then
# be able to journalize it.
body-md5: no
# Configure inspected-tracker for file_data keyword
inspected-tracker:
content-limit: 100000
content-inspect-min-size: 32768
content-inspect-window: 4096
imap:
enabled: detection-only
msn:
enabled: detection-only
smb:
enabled: yes
detection-ports:
dp: 139, 445
# smb2 detection is disabled internally inside the engine.
#smb2:
# enabled: yes
dns:
# memcaps. Globally and per flow/state.
#global-memcap: 16mb
#state-memcap: 512kb

# How many unreplied DNS requests are considered a flood.
# If the limit is reached, app-layer-event:dns.flooded; will match.
#request-flood: 500

tcp:
enabled: yes
detection-ports:
dp: 53
udp:
enabled: yes
detection-ports:
dp: 53
http:
enabled: yes
# memcap: 64mb

# default-config: Used when no server-config matches
# personality: List of personalities used by default
# request-body-limit: Limit reassembly of request body for inspection
# by http_client_body & pcre /P option.
# response-body-limit: Limit reassembly of response body for inspection
# by file_data, http_server_body & pcre /Q option.
# double-decode-path: Double decode path section of the URI
# double-decode-query: Double decode query section of the URI
# response-body-decompress-layer-limit:
# Limit to how many layers of compression will be
# decompressed. Defaults to 2.
#
# server-config: List of server configurations to use if address matches
# address: List of ip addresses or networks for this block
# personalitiy: List of personalities used by this block
# request-body-limit: Limit reassembly of request body for inspection
# by http_client_body & pcre /P option.
# response-body-limit: Limit reassembly of response body for inspection
# by file_data, http_server_body & pcre /Q option.
# double-decode-path: Double decode path section of the URI
# double-decode-query: Double decode query section of the URI
#
# uri-include-all: Include all parts of the URI. By default the
# ‘scheme’, username/password, hostname and port
# are excluded. Setting this option to true adds
# all of them to the normalized uri as inspected
# by http_uri, urilen, pcre with /U and the other
# keywords that inspect the normalized uri.
# Note that this does not affect http_raw_uri.
# Also, note that including all was the default in
# 1.4 and 2.0beta1.
#
# meta-field-limit: Hard size limit for request and response size
# limits. Applies to request line and headers,
# response line and headers. Does not apply to
# request or response bodies. Default is 18k.
# If this limit is reached an event is raised.
#
# Currently Available Personalities:
# Minimal, Generic, IDS (default), IIS_4_0, IIS_5_0, IIS_5_1, IIS_6_0,
# IIS_7_0, IIS_7_5, Apache_2
libhtp:
default-config:
personality: IDS

# Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number indicates
# it’s in bytes.
request-body-limit: 100kb
response-body-limit: 100kb

# inspection limits
request-body-minimal-inspect-size: 32kb
request-body-inspect-window: 4kb
response-body-minimal-inspect-size: 40kb
response-body-inspect-window: 16kb

# response body decompression (0 disables)
response-body-decompress-layer-limit: 2

# auto will use http-body-inline mode in IPS mode, yes or no set it statically
http-body-inline: auto

# Take a random value for inspection sizes around the specified value.
# This lower the risk of some evasion technics but could lead
# detection change between runs. It is set to ‘yes’ by default.
#randomize-inspection-sizes: yes
# If randomize-inspection-sizes is active, the value of various
# inspection size will be choosen in the [1 – range%, 1 + range%]
# range
# Default value of randomize-inspection-range is 10.
#randomize-inspection-range: 10

# decoding
double-decode-path: no
double-decode-query: no

server-config:

#- apache:
# address: [192.168.1.0/24, 127.0.0.0/8, “::1”]
# personality: Apache_2
# # Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number indicates
# # it’s in bytes.
# request-body-limit: 4096
# response-body-limit: 4096
# double-decode-path: no
# double-decode-query: no

#- iis7:
# address:
# – 192.168.0.0/24
# – 192.168.10.0/24
# personality: IIS_7_0
# # Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number indicates
# # it’s in bytes.
# request-body-limit: 4096
# response-body-limit: 4096
# double-decode-path: no
# double-decode-query: no

# Note: Modbus probe parser is minimalist due to the poor significant field
# Only Modbus message length (greater than Modbus header length)
# And Protocol ID (equal to 0) are checked in probing parser
# It is important to enable detection port and define Modbus port
# to avoid false positive
modbus:
# How many unreplied Modbus requests are considered a flood.
# If the limit is reached, app-layer-event:modbus.flooded; will match.
#request-flood: 500

enabled: no
detection-ports:
dp: 502
# According to MODBUS Messaging on TCP/IP Implementation Guide V1.0b, it
# is recommended to keep the TCP connection opened with a remote device
# and not to open and close it for each MODBUS/TCP transaction. In that
# case, it is important to set the depth of the stream reassembling as
# unlimited (stream.reassembly.depth: 0)

# Stream reassembly size for modbus. By default track it completely.
stream-depth: 0

# DNP3
dnp3:
enabled: no
detection-ports:
dp: 20000

# SCADA EtherNet/IP and CIP protocol support
enip:
enabled: no
detection-ports:
dp: 44818
sp: 44818

# Limit for the maximum number of asn1 frames to decode (default 256)
asn1-max-frames: 256

##############################################################################
##
## Advanced settings below
##
##############################################################################

##
## Run Options
##

# Run suricata as user and group.
#run-as:
# user: suri
# group: suri

# Some logging module will use that name in event as identifier. The default
# value is the hostname
#sensor-name: suricata

# Default pid file.
# Will use this file if no –pidfile in command options.
#pid-file: /var/run/suricata.pid

# Daemon working directory
# Suricata will change directory to this one if provided
# Default: “/”
#daemon-directory: “/”

# Suricata core dump configuration. Limits the size of the core dump file to
# approximately max-dump. The actual core dump size will be a multiple of the
# page size. Core dumps that would be larger than max-dump are truncated. On
# Linux, the actual core dump size may be a few pages larger than max-dump.
# Setting max-dump to 0 disables core dumping.
# Setting max-dump to ‘unlimited’ will give the full core dump file.
# On 32-bit Linux, a max-dump value >= ULONG_MAX may cause the core dump size
# to be ‘unlimited’.

coredump:
max-dump: unlimited

# If suricata box is a router for the sniffed networks, set it to ‘router’. If
# it is a pure sniffing setup, set it to ‘sniffer-only’.
# If set to auto, the variable is internally switch to ‘router’ in IPS mode
# and ‘sniffer-only’ in IDS mode.
# This feature is currently only used by the reject* keywords.
host-mode: auto

# Number of packets preallocated per thread. The default is 1024. A higher number
# will make sure each CPU will be more easily kept busy, but may negatively
# impact caching.
#
# If you are using the CUDA pattern matcher (mpm-algo: ac-cuda), different rules
# apply. In that case try something like 60000 or more. This is because the CUDA
# pattern matcher buffers and scans as many packets as possible in parallel.
max-pending-packets: 1024

# Runmode the engine should use. Please check –list-runmodes to get the available
# runmodes for each packet acquisition method. Defaults to “autofp” (auto flow pinned
# load balancing).
runmode: autofp

# Specifies the kind of flow load balancer used by the flow pinned autofp mode.
#
# Supported schedulers are:
#
# round-robin – Flows assigned to threads in a round robin fashion.
# active-packets – Flows assigned to threads that have the lowest number of
# unprocessed packets (default).
# hash – Flow alloted usihng the address hash. More of a random
# technique. Was the default in Suricata 1.2.1 and older.
#
autofp-scheduler: active-packets

# Preallocated size for packet. Default is 1514 which is the classical
# size for pcap on ethernet. You should adjust this value to the highest
# packet size (MTU + hardware header) on your system.
default-packet-size: 1514

# Unix command socket can be used to pass commands to suricata.
# An external tool can then connect to get information from suricata
# or trigger some modifications of the engine. Set enabled to yes
# to activate the feature. In auto mode, the feature will only be
# activated in live capture mode. You can use the filename variable to set
# the file name of the socket.
unix-command:
enabled: no
# filename: /var/run/suricata-command.socket

# Magic file. The extension .mgc is added to the value here.
#magic-file: /usr/share/file/magic
#magic-file:

legacy:
uricontent: enabled

##
## Detection settings
##

# Set the order of alerts bassed on actions
# The default order is pass, drop, reject, alert
# action-order:
# – pass
# – drop
# – reject
# – alert

# IP Reputation
#reputation-categories-file: /etc/suricata/iprep/categories.txt
#default-reputation-path: /etc/suricata/iprep
#reputation-files:
# – reputation.list

# When run with the option –engine-analysis, the engine will read each of
# the parameters below, and print reports for each of the enabled sections
# and exit. The reports are printed to a file in the default log dir
# given by the parameter “default-log-dir”, with engine reporting
# subsection below printing reports in its own report file.
engine-analysis:
# enables printing reports for fast-pattern for every rule.
rules-fast-pattern: yes
# enables printing reports for each rule
rules: yes

#recursion and match limits for PCRE where supported
pcre:
match-limit: 3500
match-limit-recursion: 1500

##
## Advanced Traffic Tracking and Reconstruction Settings
##

# Host specific policies for defragmentation and TCP stream
# reassembly. The host OS lookup is done using a radix tree, just
# like a routing table so the most specific entry matches.
host-os-policy:
# Make the default policy windows.
windows: [0.0.0.0/0]
bsd: []
bsd-right: []
old-linux: []
linux: []
old-solaris: []
solaris: []
hpux10: []
hpux11: []
irix: []
macos: []
vista: []
windows2k3: []

# Defrag settings:

defrag:
memcap: 32mb
hash-size: 65536
trackers: 65535 # number of defragmented flows to follow
max-frags: 65535 # number of fragments to keep (higher than trackers)
prealloc: yes
timeout: 60

# Enable defrag per host settings
# host-config:
#
# – dmz:
# timeout: 30
# address: [192.168.1.0/24, 127.0.0.0/8, 1.1.1.0/24, 2.2.2.0/24, “1.1.1.1”, “2.2.2.2”, “::1”]
#
# – lan:
# timeout: 45
# address:
# – 192.168.0.0/24
# – 192.168.10.0/24
# – 172.16.14.0/24

# Flow settings:
# By default, the reserved memory (memcap) for flows is 32MB. This is the limit
# for flow allocation inside the engine. You can change this value to allow
# more memory usage for flows.
# The hash-size determine the size of the hash used to identify flows inside
# the engine, and by default the value is 65536.
# At the startup, the engine can preallocate a number of flows, to get a better
# performance. The number of flows preallocated is 10000 by default.
# emergency-recovery is the percentage of flows that the engine need to
# prune before unsetting the emergency state. The emergency state is activated
# when the memcap limit is reached, allowing to create new flows, but
# prunning them with the emergency timeouts (they are defined below).
# If the memcap is reached, the engine will try to prune flows
# with the default timeouts. If it doens’t find a flow to prune, it will set
# the emergency bit and it will try again with more agressive timeouts.
# If that doesn’t work, then it will try to kill the last time seen flows
# not in use.
# The memcap can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number indicates it’s
# in bytes.

flow:
memcap: 128mb
hash-size: 65536
prealloc: 10000
emergency-recovery: 30
#managers: 1 # default to one flow manager
#recyclers: 1 # default to one flow recycler thread

# This option controls the use of vlan ids in the flow (and defrag)
# hashing. Normally this should be enabled, but in some (broken)
# setups where both sides of a flow are not tagged with the same vlan
# tag, we can ignore the vlan id’s in the flow hashing.
vlan:
use-for-tracking: true

# Specific timeouts for flows. Here you can specify the timeouts that the
# active flows will wait to transit from the current state to another, on each
# protocol. The value of “new” determine the seconds to wait after a hanshake or
# stream startup before the engine free the data of that flow it doesn’t
# change the state to established (usually if we don’t receive more packets
# of that flow). The value of “established” is the amount of
# seconds that the engine will wait to free the flow if it spend that amount
# without receiving new packets or closing the connection. “closed” is the
# amount of time to wait after a flow is closed (usually zero). “bypassed”
# timeout controls locally bypassed flows. For these flows we don’t do any other
# tracking. If no packets have been seen after this timeout, the flow is discarded.
#
# There’s an emergency mode that will become active under attack circumstances,
# making the engine to check flow status faster. This configuration variables
# use the prefix “emergency-” and work similar as the normal ones.
# Some timeouts doesn’t apply to all the protocols, like “closed”, for udp and
# icmp.

flow-timeouts:

default:
new: 30
established: 300
closed: 0
bypassed: 100
emergency-new: 10
emergency-established: 100
emergency-closed: 0
emergency-bypassed: 50
tcp:
new: 60
established: 600
closed: 60
bypassed: 100
emergency-new: 5
emergency-established: 100
emergency-closed: 10
emergency-bypassed: 50
udp:
new: 30
established: 300
bypassed: 100
emergency-new: 10
emergency-established: 100
emergency-bypassed: 50
icmp:
new: 30
established: 300
bypassed: 100
emergency-new: 10
emergency-established: 100
emergency-bypassed: 50

# Stream engine settings. Here the TCP stream tracking and reassembly
# engine is configured.
#
# stream:
# memcap: 32mb # Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a
# # number indicates it’s in bytes.
# checksum-validation: yes # To validate the checksum of received
# # packet. If csum validation is specified as
# # “yes”, then packet with invalid csum will not
# # be processed by the engine stream/app layer.
# # Warning: locally generated trafic can be
# # generated without checksum due to hardware offload
# # of checksum. You can control the handling of checksum
# # on a per-interface basis via the ‘checksum-checks’
# # option
# prealloc-sessions: 2k # 2k sessions prealloc’d per stream thread
# midstream: false # don’t allow midstream session pickups
# async-oneside: false # don’t enable async stream handling
# inline: no # stream inline mode
# max-synack-queued: 5 # Max different SYN/ACKs to queue
# bypass: no # Bypass packets when stream.depth is reached
#
# reassembly:
# memcap: 64mb # Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number
# # indicates it’s in bytes.
# depth: 1mb # Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number
# # indicates it’s in bytes.
# toserver-chunk-size: 2560 # inspect raw stream in chunks of at least
# # this size. Can be specified in kb, mb,
# # gb. Just a number indicates it’s in bytes.
# # The max acceptable size is 4024 bytes.
# toclient-chunk-size: 2560 # inspect raw stream in chunks of at least
# # this size. Can be specified in kb, mb,
# # gb. Just a number indicates it’s in bytes.
# # The max acceptable size is 4024 bytes.
# randomize-chunk-size: yes # Take a random value for chunk size around the specified value.
# # This lower the risk of some evasion technics but could lead
# # detection change between runs. It is set to ‘yes’ by default.
# randomize-chunk-range: 10 # If randomize-chunk-size is active, the value of chunk-size is
# # a random value between (1 – randomize-chunk-range/100)*toserver-chunk-size
# # and (1 + randomize-chunk-range/100)*toserver-chunk-size and the same
# # calculation for toclient-chunk-size.
# # Default value of randomize-chunk-range is 10.
#
# raw: yes # ‘Raw’ reassembly enabled or disabled.
# # raw is for content inspection by detection
# # engine.
#
# chunk-prealloc: 250 # Number of preallocated stream chunks. These
# # are used during stream inspection (raw).
# segments: # Settings for reassembly segment pool.
# – size: 4 # Size of the (data)segment for a pool
# prealloc: 256 # Number of segments to prealloc and keep
# # in the pool.
# zero-copy-size: 128 # This option sets in bytes the value at
# # which segment data is passed to the app
# # layer API directly. Data sizes equal to
# # and higher than the value set are passed
# # on directly.
#
stream:
memcap: 64mb
checksum-validation: yes # reject wrong csums
inline: auto # auto will use inline mode in IPS mode, yes or no set it statically
reassembly:
memcap: 256mb
depth: 1mb # reassemble 1mb into a stream
toserver-chunk-size: 2560
toclient-chunk-size: 2560
randomize-chunk-size: yes
#randomize-chunk-range: 10
#raw: yes
#chunk-prealloc: 250
#segments:
# – size: 4
# prealloc: 256
# – size: 16
# prealloc: 512
# – size: 112
# prealloc: 512
# – size: 248
# prealloc: 512
# – size: 512
# prealloc: 512
# – size: 768
# prealloc: 1024
# ‘from_mtu’ means that the size is mtu – 40,
# or 1460 if mtu couldn’t be determined.
# – size: from_mtu
# prealloc: 1024
# – size: 65535
# prealloc: 128
#zero-copy-size: 128

# Host table:
#
# Host table is used by tagging and per host thresholding subsystems.
#
host:
hash-size: 4096
prealloc: 1000
memcap: 32mb

# IP Pair table:
#
# Used by xbits ‘ippair’ tracking.
#
#ippair:
# hash-size: 4096
# prealloc: 1000
# memcap: 32mb

##
## Performance tuning and profiling
##

# The detection engine builds internal groups of signatures. The engine
# allow us to specify the profile to use for them, to manage memory on an
# efficient way keeping a good performance. For the profile keyword you
# can use the words “low”, “medium”, “high” or “custom”. If you use custom
# make sure to define the values at “- custom-values” as your convenience.
# Usually you would prefer medium/high/low.
#
# “sgh mpm-context”, indicates how the staging should allot mpm contexts for
# the signature groups. “single” indicates the use of a single context for
# all the signature group heads. “full” indicates a mpm-context for each
# group head. “auto” lets the engine decide the distribution of contexts
# based on the information the engine gathers on the patterns from each
# group head.
#
# The option inspection-recursion-limit is used to limit the recursive calls
# in the content inspection code. For certain payload-sig combinations, we
# might end up taking too much time in the content inspection code.
# If the argument specified is 0, the engine uses an internally defined
# default limit. On not specifying a value, we use no limits on the recursion.
detect:
profile: medium
custom-values:
toclient-groups: 3
toserver-groups: 25
sgh-mpm-context: auto
inspection-recursion-limit: 3000
# If set to yes, the loading of signatures will be made after the capture
# is started. This will limit the downtime in IPS mode.
#delayed-detect: yes

prefilter:
# default prefiltering setting. “mpm” only creates MPM/fast_pattern
# engines. “auto” also sets up prefilter engines for other keywords.
# Use –list-keywords=all to see which keywords support prefiltering.
default: mpm

# the grouping values above control how many groups are created per
# direction. Port whitelisting forces that port to get it’s own group.
# Very common ports will benefit, as well as ports with many expensive
# rules.
grouping:
#tcp-whitelist: 53, 80, 139, 443, 445, 1433, 3306, 3389, 6666, 6667, 8080
#udp-whitelist: 53, 135, 5060

profiling:
# Log the rules that made it past the prefilter stage, per packet
# default is off. The threshold setting determines how many rules
# must have made it past pre-filter for that rule to trigger the
# logging.
#inspect-logging-threshold: 200
grouping:
dump-to-disk: false
include-rules: false # very verbose
include-mpm-stats: false

# Select the multi pattern algorithm you want to run for scan/search the
# in the engine.
#
# The supported algorithms are:
# “ac” – Aho-Corasick, default implementation
# “ac-bs” – Aho-Corasick, reduced memory implementation
# “ac-cuda” – Aho-Corasick, CUDA implementation
# “ac-ks” – Aho-Corasick, “Ken Steele” variant
# “hs” – Hyperscan, available when built with Hyperscan support
#
# The default mpm-algo value of “auto” will use “hs” if Hyperscan is
# available, “ac” otherwise.
#
# The mpm you choose also decides the distribution of mpm contexts for
# signature groups, specified by the conf – “detect.sgh-mpm-context”.
# Selecting “ac” as the mpm would require “detect.sgh-mpm-context”
# to be set to “single”, because of ac’s memory requirements, unless the
# ruleset is small enough to fit in one’s memory, in which case one can
# use “full” with “ac”. Rest of the mpms can be run in “full” mode.
#
# There is also a CUDA pattern matcher (only available if Suricata was
# compiled with –enable-cuda: b2g_cuda. Make sure to update your
# max-pending-packets setting above as well if you use b2g_cuda.

mpm-algo: auto

# Select the matching algorithm you want to use for single-pattern searches.
#
# Supported algorithms are “bm” (Boyer-Moore) and “hs” (Hyperscan, only
# available if Suricata has been built with Hyperscan support).
#
# The default of “auto” will use “hs” if available, otherwise “bm”.

spm-algo: auto

# Suricata is multi-threaded. Here the threading can be influenced.
threading:
set-cpu-affinity: no
# Tune cpu affinity of threads. Each family of threads can be bound
# on specific CPUs.
#
# These 2 apply to the all runmodes:
# management-cpu-set is used for flow timeout handling, counters
# worker-cpu-set is used for ‘worker’ threads
#
# Additionally, for autofp these apply:
# receive-cpu-set is used for capture threads
# verdict-cpu-set is used for IPS verdict threads
#
cpu-affinity:
– management-cpu-set:
cpu: [ 0 ] # include only these cpus in affinity settings
– receive-cpu-set:
cpu: [ 0 ] # include only these cpus in affinity settings
– worker-cpu-set:
cpu: [ “all” ]
mode: “exclusive”
# Use explicitely 3 threads and don’t compute number by using
# detect-thread-ratio variable:
# threads: 3
prio:
low: [ 0 ]
medium: [ “1-2” ]
high: [ 3 ]
default: “medium”
#- verdict-cpu-set:
# cpu: [ 0 ]
# prio:
# default: “high”
#
# By default Suricata creates one “detect” thread per available CPU/CPU core.
# This setting allows controlling this behaviour. A ratio setting of 2 will
# create 2 detect threads for each CPU/CPU core. So for a dual core CPU this
# will result in 4 detect threads. If values below 1 are used, less threads
# are created. So on a dual core CPU a setting of 0.5 results in 1 detect
# thread being created. Regardless of the setting at a minimum 1 detect
# thread will always be created.
#
detect-thread-ratio: 1.0

# Luajit has a strange memory requirement, it’s ‘states’ need to be in the
# first 2G of the process’ memory.
#
# ‘luajit.states’ is used to control how many states are preallocated.
# State use: per detect script: 1 per detect thread. Per output script: 1 per
# script.
luajit:
states: 128

# Profiling settings. Only effective if Suricata has been built with the
# the –enable-profiling configure flag.
#
profiling:
# Run profiling for every xth packet. The default is 1, which means we
# profile every packet. If set to 1000, one packet is profiled for every
# 1000 received.
#sample-rate: 1000

# rule profiling
rules:

# Profiling can be disabled here, but it will still have a
# performance impact if compiled in.
enabled: yes
filename: rule_perf.log
append: yes

# Sort options: ticks, avgticks, checks, matches, maxticks
sort: avgticks

# Limit the number of items printed at exit (ignored for json).
limit: 100

# output to json
json: yes

# per keyword profiling
keywords:
enabled: yes
filename: keyword_perf.log
append: yes

# per rulegroup profiling
rulegroups:
enabled: yes
filename: rule_group_perf.log
append: yes

# packet profiling
packets:

# Profiling can be disabled here, but it will still have a
# performance impact if compiled in.
enabled: yes
filename: packet_stats.log
append: yes

# per packet csv output
csv:

# Output can be disabled here, but it will still have a
# performance impact if compiled in.
enabled: no
filename: packet_stats.csv

# profiling of locking. Only available when Suricata was built with
# –enable-profiling-locks.
locks:
enabled: no
filename: lock_stats.log
append: yes

pcap-log:
enabled: no
filename: pcaplog_stats.log
append: yes

##
## Netfilter integration
##

# When running in NFQ inline mode, it is possible to use a simulated
# non-terminal NFQUEUE verdict.
# This permit to do send all needed packet to suricata via this a rule:
# iptables -I FORWARD -m mark ! –mark $MARK/$MASK -j NFQUEUE
# And below, you can have your standard filtering ruleset. To activate
# this mode, you need to set mode to ‘repeat’
# If you want packet to be sent to another queue after an ACCEPT decision
# set mode to ‘route’ and set next-queue value.
# On linux >= 3.1, you can set batchcount to a value > 1 to improve performance
# by processing several packets before sending a verdict (worker runmode only).
# On linux >= 3.6, you can set the fail-open option to yes to have the kernel
# accept the packet if suricata is not able to keep pace.
# bypass mark and mask can be used to implement NFQ bypass. If bypass mark is
# set then the NFQ bypass is activated. Suricata will set the bypass mark/mask
# on packet of a flow that need to be bypassed. The Nefilter ruleset has to
# directly accept all packets of a flow once a packet has been marked.
nfq:
# mode: accept
repeat-mark: 1
repeat-mask: 1
# bypass-mark: 1
# bypass-mask: 1
# route-queue: 2
# batchcount: 20
fail-open: yes

#nflog support
nflog:
# netlink multicast group
# (the same as the iptables –nflog-group param)
# Group 0 is used by the kernel, so you can’t use it
– group: 2
# netlink buffer size
buffer-size: 18432
# put default value here
– group: default
# set number of packet to queue inside kernel
qthreshold: 1
# set the delay before flushing packet in the queue inside kernel
qtimeout: 100
# netlink max buffer size
max-size: 20000

##
## Advanced Capture Options
##

# general settings affecting packet capture
capture:
# disable NIC offloading. It’s restored when Suricata exists.
# Enabled by default
#disable-offloading: false
#
# disable checksum validation. Same as setting ‘-k none’ on the
# commandline
#checksum-validation: none

# Netmap support
#
# Netmap operates with NIC directly in driver, so you need FreeBSD wich have
# built-in netmap support or compile and install netmap module and appropriate
# NIC driver on your Linux system.
# To reach maximum throughput disable all receive-, segmentation-,
# checksum- offloadings on NIC.
# Disabling Tx checksum offloading is *required* for connecting OS endpoint
# with NIC endpoint.
# You can find more information at https://github.com/luigirizzo/netmap
#
netmap:
# To specify OS endpoint add plus sign at the end (e.g. “eth0+”)
– interface: eth2
# Number of receive threads. “auto” uses number of RSS queues on interface.
#threads: auto
# You can use the following variables to activate netmap tap or IPS mode.
# If copy-mode is set to ips or tap, the traffic coming to the current
# interface will be copied to the copy-iface interface. If ‘tap’ is set, the
# copy is complete. If ‘ips’ is set, the packet matching a ‘drop’ action
# will not be copied.
# To specify the OS as the copy-iface (so the OS can route packets, or forward
# to a service running on the same machine) add a plus sign at the end
# (e.g. “copy-iface: eth0+”). Don’t forget to set up a symmetrical eth0+ -> eth0
# for return packets. Hardware checksumming must be *off* on the interface if
# using an OS endpoint (e.g. ‘ifconfig eth0 -rxcsum -txcsum -rxcsum6 -txcsum6’ for FreeBSD
# or ‘ethtool -K eth0 tx off rx off’ for Linux).
#copy-mode: tap
#copy-iface: eth3
# Set to yes to disable promiscuous mode
# disable-promisc: no
# Choose checksum verification mode for the interface. At the moment
# of the capture, some packets may be with an invalid checksum due to
# offloading to the network card of the checksum computation.
# Possible values are:
# – yes: checksum validation is forced
# – no: checksum validation is disabled
# – auto: suricata uses a statistical approach to detect when
# checksum off-loading is used.
# Warning: ‘checksum-validation’ must be set to yes to have any validation
#checksum-checks: auto
# BPF filter to apply to this interface. The pcap filter syntax apply here.
#bpf-filter: port 80 or udp
#- interface: eth3
#threads: auto
#copy-mode: tap
#copy-iface: eth2
# Put default values here
– interface: default

# PF_RING configuration. for use with native PF_RING support
# for more info see http://www.ntop.org/products/pf_ring/
pfring:
– interface: eth0
# Number of receive threads (>1 will enable experimental flow pinned
# runmode)
threads: 1

# Default clusterid. PF_RING will load balance packets based on flow.
# All threads/processes that will participate need to have the same
# clusterid.
cluster-id: 99

# Default PF_RING cluster type. PF_RING can load balance per flow.
# Possible values are cluster_flow or cluster_round_robin.
cluster-type: cluster_flow
# bpf filter for this interface
#bpf-filter: tcp
# Choose checksum verification mode for the interface. At the moment
# of the capture, some packets may be with an invalid checksum due to
# offloading to the network card of the checksum computation.
# Possible values are:
# – rxonly: only compute checksum for packets received by network card.
# – yes: checksum validation is forced
# – no: checksum validation is disabled
# – auto: suricata uses a statistical approach to detect when
# checksum off-loading is used. (default)
# Warning: ‘checksum-validation’ must be set to yes to have any validation
#checksum-checks: auto
# Second interface
#- interface: eth1
# threads: 3
# cluster-id: 93
# cluster-type: cluster_flow
# Put default values here
– interface: default
#threads: 2

# For FreeBSD ipfw(8) divert(4) support.
# Please make sure you have ipfw_load=”YES” and ipdivert_load=”YES”
# in /etc/loader.conf or kldload’ing the appropriate kernel modules.
# Additionally, you need to have an ipfw rule for the engine to see
# the packets from ipfw. For Example:
#
# ipfw add 100 divert 8000 ip from any to any
#
# The 8000 above should be the same number you passed on the command
# line, i.e. -d 8000
#
ipfw:

# Reinject packets at the specified ipfw rule number. This config
# option is the ipfw rule number AT WHICH rule processing continues
# in the ipfw processing system after the engine has finished
# inspecting the packet for acceptance. If no rule number is specified,
# accepted packets are reinjected at the divert rule which they entered
# and IPFW rule processing continues. No check is done to verify
# this will rule makes sense so care must be taken to avoid loops in ipfw.
#
## The following example tells the engine to reinject packets
# back into the ipfw firewall AT rule number 5500:
#
# ipfw-reinjection-rule-number: 5500

napatech:
# The Host Buffer Allowance for all streams
# (-1 = OFF, 1 – 100 = percentage of the host buffer that can be held back)
hba: -1

# use_all_streams set to “yes” will query the Napatech service for all configured
# streams and listen on all of them. When set to “no” the streams config array
# will be used.
use-all-streams: yes

# The streams to listen on
streams: [1, 2, 3]

# Tilera mpipe configuration. for use on Tilera TILE-Gx.
mpipe:

# Load balancing modes: “static”, “dynamic”, “sticky”, or “round-robin”.
load-balance: dynamic

# Number of Packets in each ingress packet queue. Must be 128, 512, 2028 or 65536
iqueue-packets: 2048

# List of interfaces we will listen on.
inputs:
– interface: xgbe2
– interface: xgbe3
– interface: xgbe4

# Relative weight of memory for packets of each mPipe buffer size.
stack:
size128: 0
size256: 9
size512: 0
size1024: 0
size1664: 7
size4096: 0
size10386: 0
size16384: 0

##
## Hardware accelaration
##

# Cuda configuration.
cuda:
# The “mpm” profile. On not specifying any of these parameters, the engine’s
# internal default values are used, which are same as the ones specified in
# in the default conf file.
mpm:
# The minimum length required to buffer data to the gpu.
# Anything below this is MPM’ed on the CPU.
# Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number indicates it’s in bytes.
# A value of 0 indicates there’s no limit.
data-buffer-size-min-limit: 0
# The maximum length for data that we would buffer to the gpu.
# Anything over this is MPM’ed on the CPU.
# Can be specified in kb, mb, gb. Just a number indicates it’s in bytes.
data-buffer-size-max-limit: 1500
# The ring buffer size used by the CudaBuffer API to buffer data.
cudabuffer-buffer-size: 500mb
# The max chunk size that can be sent to the gpu in a single go.
gpu-transfer-size: 50mb
# The timeout limit for batching of packets in microseconds.
batching-timeout: 2000
# The device to use for the mpm. Currently we don’t support load balancing
# on multiple gpus. In case you have multiple devices on your system, you
# can specify the device to use, using this conf. By default we hold 0, to
# specify the first device cuda sees. To find out device-id associated with
# the card(s) on the system run “suricata –list-cuda-cards”.
device-id: 0
# No of Cuda streams used for asynchronous processing. All values > 0 are valid.
# For this option you need a device with Compute Capability > 1.0.
cuda-streams: 2

##
## Include other configs
##

# Includes. Files included here will be handled as if they were
# inlined in this configuration file.
#include: include1.yaml
#include: include2.yaml


Categorised as: IDS | Linux | Networking | Work

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